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File: 1465176497320.gif (473.46 KB, 500x355, 1445041507227.gif)

 No.1[Reply]

Welp, everybody's claiming First in all the other boards and I don't want to be left behind. Thankfully the nerd board is still avaiblable.
What are you girls working on?
Me: chip-8 VM in ruby
28 posts and 8 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1189

>>1188
This sushi roll is correct. With a help desk job you still have to deal with people but it's nowhere near the same level as a call centre job, especially if you work for a small company.

 No.1191

>>1188
Ok, I was confused. In my language, the English term "help desk" is also used for call center tech support.

University help desks can be pretty comfy.

 No.1242

i'm making a game in bash

 No.1246

>>1242
Please, share

 No.1247

>>1246
i will when it's finished.



File: 1536366974595.png (129.74 KB, 2000x1080, php.png)

 No.1126[Reply]

Do any of you know PHP? If so, do you have any recommendations for learning it? I'm not new to programming or web development in general, but I started learning Node instead of older shit like LAMP.
4 posts and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1182

>>1180
like this
d

 No.1218

>>1126
Don't. It's the third worst server side scripting language, with node.js and perl being first and second respectively

 No.1220

>>1218
I'm learning it for security reasons, not for development. As in: if you want to learn about pen testing/hacking sites with PHP, you have to know PHP (unless you just want to be a skid who only knows basic RFI stuff).

Only for legal security stuff, of course.

PHP being terrible is bad only from a developer's or blue teamer's perspective. It's amazing from a red team perspective.

 No.1243

>>1180
That's a meme I haven't seen in a long time.

 No.1244

>>1243
I'm too old for keeping up with gen Z's memes so I'm reverting back to ancient ones.



File: 1538098743801.jpg (47.11 KB, 220x330, stallman.jpg)

 No.1168[Reply]

People would take open source software more seriously if Stallman took better care of himself. He looks like a stereotypical neckbeard, which doesn't help the image of free software.
33 posts and 17 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1236

>>1225
I used to use a Linux distro as a daily driver OS, back when I was young and didn't use a computer for work or college. But now that I'm older, and do a lot more stuff on my computer, there is a massive gap in support for commercial software in Windows and macOS (similarly well-supported) and GNU/Linux (practically non-existent).

If your requirements are pretty basic, GNU/Linux seems fine for a desktop OS.

But you can't use a lot of industry-standard tools for it. The problem is that a lot of people who don't use these things think the FOSS equivalents are "good enough" even though that's not the case.

GIMP really isn't as good as Photoshop. LibreOffice is quirky sometimes, and that can be an issue when you work with people who all use Microsoft Office 365. Outlook is standard as an office email client, Thunderbird isn't that great.

IF all you do is web-based stuff, you won't notice a difference. But try using GNU/Linux for creative work, programming, or office job stuff, and you'll notice all the flaws. There are a lot of what I'd call "spinoff apps" in GNU/Linux desktop OS repos, and although they might look relatively decent, most really aren't.

People don't use an OS for the OS itself. They use an OS so they can run software in it. Nobody cares about bits and bytes and window managers. People care about getting a project done before a deadline, using tools that enhance their workflow, stability, actual customer support (forums and image boards don't count), etc. As Steve Ballmer once said, "developers developers developers developers developers developers developers developers." 3rd party development is what really makes or breaks an OS. The software ecosystem around an OS is really important.

Linux is continuing to prove itself useful for embedded and IoT scenarios, and will always be the best choice for servers, but GNU/Linux is less and less relevant for desktop stuff.

Post too long. Click here to view the full text.

 No.1237

>>1236
>The problem is that a lot of people who don't use these things think the FOSS equivalents are "good enough" even though that's not the case.

I can kinda relate to this, I remember a discussion where I was told that I should use emulators for gaming on Linux or "get a console" when I pointed out how poor PC gaming is on Linux. So, actually, I completely understand what you mean even though I don't use any sort of industry standard software.

And, actually, it's kinda silly, but I use Windows as well not just for gaming but sometimes I find the tools for creating Linux bootable drives way better. Again, even though I'd love to see more people with basic needs use Linux on their laptops and desktops, even I use different OSes for different tasks.

I guess the only other issue with FOSS is the immature "Wangblows" and "Botnet 10" buzzwording. I don't know how to talk with people like that since the debate never goes anywhere.

 No.1238

File: 1540574781193.png (728.88 KB, 1924x1231, Screenshot at 2018-10-26 1….png)

>>1236
>Outlook is standard as an office email client, Thunderbird isn't that great.
On the free software side, I've settled on Evolution. I could never enjoy thunderbird or claws/sylpheed, and I don't know if it can replace Outlook for businesses, but I think it is a decent alternative for someone like me that was perfectly happy with Apple's Mail.app.

But as you say, my requirements are basic (outside of virtual machines).

>>1237
But all you need is Quake :3

 No.1240

File: 1540667214074.png (279.66 KB, 473x1061, 1517481457295.png)

>>1236
> But try using GNU/Linux for creative work
This is merely a personal thing, but the times when I used open source stuff for creative work, I had no problem working with it. Krita is already well known and loved, but personally I largely stuck with doing stuff in MyPaint and Inkscape after I decided to stop pirating Adobe stuff. GIMP is pretty clunky, and Inkscape posed some issue initially too, but I could still work well with the tools I had.

It's likely I'm not quite advanced enough to need the Adobe tools. On the other hand, David Revoy exists.

 No.1241

>>1240
Yeah, I have to agree. I don't really find there is much difference at the low level between modern popular open source software, and closed source enterprise software. Ten years ago there were pretty big differences, but today the only real differences I notice tend to be in the UI department, and in how the software corporations get to dictate how people relate to software in general. Like people say how clunky open source is, but I think that's mainly because their baseline has been set based on whatever software they use at work. As someone who hasn't really used commercial software outside of when it's absolutely necessary (for work comparability and stuff), I find that often times the commercial stuff is just as clunky and poorly designed, but people just take that for granted. It being "intuitive" or better is just a function of being more exposed to it.

I mean, of course it is true that companies like adobe cater to industries creating tools and tweeks for specific clients and such, that isn't really gonna happen in an open source community driven product, but I don't think those are nearly as useful to users as they are to firms with specific market goals. I've always got the feeling that when most people say "open source software is inadequate" they really mean "I do not want to learn a whole new system when I already know this one inside and out". It's fine to prefer a polished commercial system that you know, but I don't think it's fair that FOSS gets a bad rap because of that.



File: 1540525031494.jpg (81.98 KB, 618x332, tech.jpg)

 No.1232[Reply]

Whenever I try to teach my dad about new tech, he will try to make some convoluted analogy comparing it to other things he is familiar with. I say no, it's not like that at all, don't make these inaccurate and confusing comparisons.

But maybe it's hard for old people to learn new things, especially new tech, because they have so many memories, and their brains have made certain neural pathways and have decreased neuroplasticity, so it's hard for them to just think of new things on their own and not comparing them to lots of other things they are already familiar with.

Sometimes I make this learning mistake, but sometimes it's easier just to learn something without trying to think of how it relates to other things. Whether it's a new programming paradigm, a new programming language, new app, new API, etc there isn't always a direct comparison to something else.

Thoughts? What have your experiences been like when you learn new tech?

 No.1233

Depends on the analogies. It seems fine to me that someone compare some new concept to something they already is familiar with. The most important thing is that they learn.

I myself like to simplify, like when people talk about cloud stuff like azure and their "apps", and all I see is a virtual machine running on hardware you don't own or manage yourself. I often get strong resistance from such people when I simplify like that. Usually I just see a new spin on old technology. The worst ones strongly disagree with what I said, then change a few words and repeat back to me what I just said. Maybe they think I'm dismissing their new stuff as unimportant, which isn't the case at all.

I often have a hard time learning from documentation and guides that just list out all the commands you need to run to get your desired result. I need to learn why you must run those commands, and I want the explanation in plain english. I think Gentoo and FreeBSD are good about such things, and is something I try hard to live up to when I have to teach something to some new user.

 No.1234

This is how everyone learns; the human brain is always trying to contextualise new knowledge in relation to old. We begin with fuzzy representaions that may be wrong in many areas, but provide enough information to engage with that object. The next crucial stage is coming to realise, through use, the ways in which computer is not actually like a car and needs a set of symbols of its own.

Don't be hard on your dad just because he didn't grow up with modern technology like you did. I have no doubt that there are concepts out there that you understand in terms of how they're simmilar to computers.

>>1233
It's the classic mistake of describing all the details of [i]what[/i] something is, when most of the time a user actually wants to know [i]how[/i] it should be used. The OpenBSD man pages are generally excellent at providing practical examples; I frequently check them, even when working on Gnu/Linux.

 No.1235

>>1233
Azure and AWS are more than just VMs. Containers and container orchestrators (and microservices architecture you can create with it) is very different from traditional hypervisors and VMs in the sense of scalability, and creating/destroying containers really quickly on an as-needed basis ("elasticity"). There's also caching, lots of APIs you won't get with a basic hypervisor, and the fact that many places are looking to hire people with these specific skills. And, of course, the issue of not having to build a data center to have at-scale resources.

A reductionist approach to it isn't going to make anyone think you're smart just because you're vaguely familiar with something you think is the same even when it's really not.

Documentation is important, but you're right, a lot of documentation is hard to follow. I think part of that is because experiential learning is best. It's hard to get an idea of how to use something based on a man page, but doing on online course, or an in-person workshop at a hackathon is wonderful for learning. These days, I actually prefer watching Youtube tutorials over reading documentation, with the one exception being the Oracle API documentation, which is really good, even if you're not a fan of Java.

But I also think a lot of boomers in tech take pride in the fact that there is a barrier to entry, and they kind of enjoy that some things are difficult to learn, even if it's only because documentation and community resources are poor. They want that elitist mentality instead of making things easier to use.

A program being hard to use is an example of bad UX, which is the fault of the developer. But a lot of "1337" people think something being hard to use makes it better. I do a lot of frontend development and if the user can't figure out how to use it, that's your problem, not theirs.

 No.1239

>>1235
>A reductionist approach to it isn't going to make anyone think you're smart just because you're vaguely familiar with something you think is the same even when it's really not.

Someone that sees the nuts and bolts aren't trying to sound smart. They just see the simple construct the bigger house is really made of. A lot of people see the big house and think they can't ever fix that on their own, others just see the broken bolt and replace that.

Yes there are APIs, and yes it is scalable, and reduces the need for a business to run their own data center, but it is still very much just a bunch of virtual machines. You're renting a machine preinstalled with MSSQL, or maybe another with some other service (or no services). A lot of cloud providers that just present their stuff as KVM-based virtual machines also have APIs for developers and admins.



File: 1502316332330.png (75.5 KB, 800x800, __chen_touhou_drawn_by_tor….png)

 No.631[Reply]

Hello guys i need help im trying to make my own imageboard. but i am very new to this. i once installed vichan through gui years back but i get this issue when i try to install the program through putty.
[code]:~/vichan# php install.php
The program 'php' can be found in the following packages:
* php7.0-cli
* hhvm
Try: apt install <selected package>
[/code]
6 posts omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1226

>>1222
Not that sushi roll, but I'm pretty skeptical of anything done with stuff like node, mostly due to how stuff like npm and pip took off. It's become harder to find certain projects and their dependencies for download due to them only ever being distributed with their language specific package manager. I feel a lot more comfortable with php since I don't get the impression php devs demand the use of language specific package managers as much. Those package managers can be pretty dangerous to use if you don't pay attention and install software as root (npm recently had an issue where it messed up the file permissions on the entire system). It's not the languages fault these package managers are shit, but as a user, I don't want to deal with these package managers at all.

 No.1227

>>1222
>Node is not like PHP where stuff turn into shit because of a bad foundation.
but Node is like that.

 No.1228

>>1226
But you are not forced to use npm, you can use yarn or just copy libraries wherever you want. And you can always check the whole dependency tree, not to mention that is not hard to go by without pulling a million dependencies. What you are confusing here is a community issue with a technology issue. The technology is fine, the community is just bad. Which is not at all surprising, ANY popular technology manages to turn like that. Java and PHP are two other examples that no matter what the technology would offer, you would still have masses of inept developers using it.

 No.1229

>>1228
I'm not confusing it at all. They're both related. As a user, I don't want to use good technology that end up ruined by the community. Another package manager isn't going to fix the lameness of language specific package managers. If they do use a package manager, it should not ever install to /usr or /usr/local (the former belongs to the package manager, the latter belongs the the make install guy). a subdirectory under /opt is fine. I would prefer if they made it very clear to never run their package managers as root as well.

I think it is overall much easier to deal with software in perl than most of these newer languages, mostly due to the culture around them. perl software is rarely an issue to deal with. Clearly defined dependencies, easy to work with without their specified package manager. Many other languages like python, ruby, node end up very annoying to deal with in my opinion. They might be fine languages, but software by other people is a chore to deal with.

 No.1230

If you're a beginner, use Vichan. Lynxchan has some nice features and it's fast and it's still actively developed, but you have to be an expert to install and use it. I tried experimenting with it a while back and it was pretty awful to get working and to modify, though I cobbled it together eventually. You also probably aren't going to be able to run it without shell access to your server, which means you need a VPS instead of a shared host, and you have to be good at using Linux on top of knowing node.js. Beginners should stay away from Lynxchan. It will be an incredibly frustrating experience.



File: 1507829538854-0.png (57.7 KB, 1233x425, bitbay.png)

File: 1507829538854-1.png (42.15 KB, 1797x188, bitbay2.png)

File: 1507829538854-2.png (168.46 KB, 640x480, PepeCurrency.png)

 No.666[Reply]

Crypto thread? Personally I think crypto is the future. No more centralization, no more states fucking you in the ass.
I also don't want to become a wage slave so I hope to make it thanks to crypto. Life is too short to not do what you like.
What cryptocurrencies have you invested in sushinons? What are you bullish on?
It would be cool that we all make it.

Personally I am extremely bullish on Bitbay. I missed the Ethereum train but I think Bitbay will be the next moon mission in 2018. It is the sole working decentralized marketplace and trustless contracting platform while fixing many BTC flaws and planning to have a decentralized peg that brings price stability by preventing volatility, especially from whales shady manipulation. The price is still fucking low (23m market cap) so there is a lot of growth potential. For instance, to have a x2 ROIs with ETH, it would need 30 fucking billions of dollars, while with bitbay it would only need 23m. It is far more likely in the latter for this very reason.
Pics related why I am bullish on it. It has both mainstream and darknet potential.
8 posts omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.682

I wish I'd had bitcoins before the recent forks – I could have doubled my money, twice. Extra money for investing is hard to keep on hand.

The other currencies that interest me currently are Ethereum and Monero. Monero seems like it is starting to pick up use within the Darknet, and if this illicit popularity takes off then I think its value could balloon suddenly like Bitcoin did years ago.

 No.686

>>682
>ethereum
Let me warm you too that Ethereum is a ticking bomb. It uses PoW like Bitcoin so it has the same problems than it (extremely slow tx processing, centralized by mining mafias and enormous waste of energy/ressources = is not viable). The worst of the worst is that it is fucking bloated to death.
Look: https://etherscan.io/chart/chaindatasizefull
Right now a full node is fucking 350gb and its growth rate keeps getting faster.
This will lead to two options: either it will crash at some point, or either it will get centralized. Also most of its token is vaporware that is not used.

Also Monero is PoW so it has the same problems of it too. Most importantly, privacy tech only interest a few. Normies do not care about it.

 No.949

>>686
>PoW is a waste of electricity
I disagree. The amount of energy used by traditional banking infrastructure is far greater. If PoW-based currencies become more popular, its energy use will probably be the same as the traditional banking system. Lower for Monero's PoW because it is memory/cache bound.

 No.1184

File: 1539247206453.png (58.34 KB, 499x500, 1513803405444.png)

Monero is based ok?
No, seriously, I think it's the comfiest cryptocurrency.

 No.1185

I sometimes think about doing it but the tutorials I find never really go into depth about it and then I forget about it afterwards. i should probably do something about it soon.



File: 1521250046806.png (2.6 MB, 1080x1920, Screenshot_20180316-222349.png)

 No.806[Reply]

Post a screenshot of your current cool/cute wallpaper! Both desktop and phone caps are ok!

I'll start with some vaporwave vibes.
51 posts and 51 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1156

>>1142
The game itself. I've also got Zork, as you can see, and K-On Desktop Buddies. Thank you for the wallpaper!

 No.1163

File: 1537569565122-0.jpg (534.92 KB, 1080x2220, Screenshot_20180921-175239….jpg)

File: 1537569565122-1.jpg (514.91 KB, 1080x2220, Screenshot_20180921-175248….jpg)

>>1031
2 new homescreens later, I've been working on this one. I'm still not too sure about colours and positioning yet, but it usually takes me a while to tweak everything to satisfaction

 No.1164

File: 1537753716959.png (1.04 MB, 1440x900, desktop.png)


 No.1175

File: 1538652636537.png (2.18 MB, 1920x1080, Bildschirmfoto_2018-10-04_….png)


 No.1181

File: 1539160796305.jpg (131.82 KB, 1280x800, 04.jpg)




File: 1522534216021.jpg (475 KB, 1753x2048, 1520045797634.jpg)

 No.846[Reply]

I was thinking it would be nice if we had a thread for sharing our own websites/homepages. Woah, here's one now! Show me your netspace sushi!

Here's mine. It's a complete mess, but I like it. It's kind of new well, technically it's existed for a little while, but I only started working on it recently, so it's missing a lot of things, and there are a few links that 404. Though it's hosted on neocities, it's only slighty Lain themed.
https://birdcom.neocities.org/
47 posts and 22 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1166

I'm learning to make a website so I can show it off to potential employers. I'm nowhere near at the level you guys are at yet though. I'm just trying to make something basic with a blog. I tried following a tutorial for creating a PHP blog with XAMPP but it was littered with errors and it looked like more effort than it was worth.

How do you guys create your blogs?

 No.1167

>>1166
Wordpress is the easiest, but also the least impressive, because all it really demonstrates is the ability to install a CMS.

You could also use Jekyll Bootstrap to generate static pages.

 No.1170

File: 1538448702343.png (603.22 KB, 1280x720, thumbs up chio.png)

>>1166
The most basic way to do it is to
>1a. Make a html template for your pages
>1b. Make a seperate css stylesheet
>2. Experiment with how it looks until you're comfortable with it
>3. Make a bunch of pages using your template and link 'em all together.
Of course, your employer probably won't want to have to fiddle with the html, and it's pretty annoying to have to modify each page whenever you change something in the template, but it's a start.

 No.1171

Been thinking about making a website for a while now. Mostly to have somewhere to host a simple blog and various projects. Jekyll as mentioned by >>1167 seems interesting, but I really don't like playing with ruby gems or python pip. Any other well maintained and simple CMS around? Mostly looking for recommendations. I found hugo which is written in go, but something in c or sh/bash would be nice too (if they're well maintained).

 No.1173

I started using neocities because it's free and good for a practice website lol.

>>1167
Yeah the majority of what I see online is about Wordpress but I was worried about it not looking very impressive.

>>1170
I've gotten this far and it looks alright, just a little annoying to have to modify the html every time I want to make a new post, as you said. It's also not very impressive but to someone who doesn't check the html, it looks just like any other blog site haha.

Thanks sushis.



File: 1536887955890-0.jpg (319.3 KB, 1229x1229, 1455508328997-0.jpg)

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File: 1536887955890-2.jpg (78.6 KB, 1170x660, e3-2018-beat-saber-feature….jpg)

 No.1160[Reply]

Resurrecting this thread out of the .tokyo archives. Any sushi rolls here own a VR headset? Any rolls just curious about them? What games/experiences are you trying these days? Any small projects that you would recommend trying?

The last thread was made just as the two main PC headsets (Oculus Rift and Vive) were coming out in 2016. In the two years since, we've seen slow but constant growth in both headset sales and the number of available games. In addition, the lineup of Windows Mixed Reality headsets is making room-scale VR with hand tracking more affordable than ever. Beat Saber is helping to push VR to arcades across the country and I really hope this is the time when VR makes it to the mainstream.

 No.1162

File: 1537234245271.jpg (35.25 KB, 658x370, Magic-Leap-One-AR-System-6….jpg)

"VR" headsets still kind of suck based on what I've tried. I'm waiting a few more generations till we get 8k resolutions at least, plus things like millimeter wave antennae built in for high bandwidth wireless. The SLAM they use could be updated as well, probably would make sense to use something like solid state lidar for that compared to the finicky webcam tracking systems they currently use.

Also, if this isn't too off topic, is anyone here interested in AR headsets as well as VR headsets? Magic leap recently finally started shipping their devkits, and while it's not anywhere near as good as the hype, it's a step up from the hololens in terms of FOV. Another generation or two of increased FOV and lighter weight and I could almost imagine using something like this to replace my phone.

 No.1165

I tried a VR headset once at a local convention five or so years ago but I got motion sickness from it.

 No.1172

File: 1538536257828.webm (2.82 MB, 1280x720, 1538266790695.webm)

I have a rift and right now I've been playing a bunch of Vox Machinae and Pavlov. I got this thing back in January and I really enjoy all the games I got for this thing, even emulating some older gamecube games using it feels refreshing. As for my recommendations, Vox and Pavlov are both great if a little arcadey, Onward is an excelent milsim, Beatsaber with mods is a treat and will help you get your vr legs.



 No.1161[Reply]

Any wiki needs out there? I just set up a MediaWiki instance and I’m having a lot of fun. I will post a link if anyone is interested in sand boxing around.


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