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/silicon/ - technology

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 No.257[Reply][Last 50 Posts]

Let's talk coding and software, sushis, because I don't do enough of it and I really should. Let's hear about projects you're working on, stuff your coding, learning. Trade secrets, info, tips, whatever. Programming isn't something that should be done alone in a corner.

I guess if we need a thread starter, I want to brush up on my coding skills. I want to find something to play around with, something not as mainstream as the stuff like Java and C, but will still be useful in a professional setting, something I can make usable stuff out of.
103 posts and 26 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1812

>>1791
>>1793
Most science is done in Python or R. The amount of packages with convenient tools available for these environments is immense. Any number crunching you do will almost certainly rely on C-written backends (e.g. numpy, and all of the other libraries that use numpy).

Python is also super popular in science since it's so quick to learn and to write. Plus, why roll your own statistics library in C when you don't have to? Science has to be done!

I was on the C high horse for years and years, but you cannot go wrong with Python for science. (But Python for high network throughput simulations… see my other post.)

 No.1814

>>1812
My problem isn't so much with Python or its packages. Its the language I'm most familiar with, so I use it to prototype programs pretty often.

I just don't like Jupyter Notebooks because they're used simultaneously as an editor, interpreter, markdown formatter, and (in my course) a presentation tool. I'm getting used to them now, but its a lot of features to figure out how/when to use properly. I'm used to writing in vim/nano and running stuff from commandline so I don't really take advantage of anything except the basic features every time I've tried IDE's.

 No.1815

>>1814
Ah I see what you mean. I haven't used Jupyter notebooks but I have seen a bit of it. I have always used vim too so that would be uncomfortable for me as well.

 No.1821

>>1814
RMarkdown, Jupyter Notebooks, et al are very comfy when your first concern is the science and math behind an idea and you don't really care about writing software for the particular task. "Editor" is not in the vocabulary of most computational researchers, because the computing is the means to the scientific ends they're after.

That's my assumption of why they prefer it at least…

 No.1826

>>1821
More on that:
ruby, python, haskell, and many other languages provide interactive shells that make it very easy to toy around with and try different language features and parts to see how they work, and to prototype ideas. APL also has interactive environments that predate yet resemble a lot of what the Jupyter experience looks like: tryapl.org



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 No.74[Reply][Last 50 Posts]

LINUX'!!'
>what is it?
An operating system that respects your freedom
>why would I use it?
If you are tired of having your OS use you and always wanted to use your computer instead
>What do you mean by freedom?
Write your own programs. use source code from the internet in seconds. update when you want to not when it tells you.
Want to run a website? cool! you can set one up in minutes.
Want to adjust your hardware to your liking? Awesome!
Want to stop or make a new feature to a program you use every day? Go for it!

Its your computer! use it how you want!
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 No.1820

>>1818
Do you suppose more people will start using Guix in the next 5 years, or will the userbase remain relatively stable?

 No.1822

I've been wanting to add a seperate user to my debian machine as a "blank slate". Minimal programs, no internet; just somewhere to write stories and play with code without distractions.

When I ran Mint before, I remember easily creating a user account that only had the default programs and hadn't had its internet connection set up. When I add new users on my current Debian setup, they'll still have the same programs and (wifi) settings. I know I could manually chmod programs and futz with settings to restrict access, but is there an easier way to set up a seperate, minimal user?

Sorry if its a newbie question, my g**gle-fu isn't coming up with results that address what I'm looking for.

 No.1823

>>1822
make a vm for it, it lets you trash and rebuild if you want. maybe that's too "heavyweight" for what you want though.

 No.1824

>>1822
I think you can do it by changing the groups the user is part of

 No.1825

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>>1822
I use Debian and manage my connections with the program nmtui - I believe it came installed by default. In nmtui, when you edit a connection, you can set it to not be available to all users - see picrel. Maybe you'd want to do that.

However, I also like >>1823 idea about making a VM for your minimal setup. Once you've set it up (it's very easy if you use a GUI like virt-manager), you can just go fullscreen in your VM and pretend you're on a different system entirely.



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 No.1513[Reply]

Let's try this again

What will happen to a blank document everyone has access to?

https://board.net/p/sushiroll
9 posts omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1804

2021 and we're still going, people!
Sushichan won't die today!

 No.1805

I'm very tempted to paste the futa again, for old times sake, but I won't

 No.1806

>>1805
Coward

 No.1808

>>1806
Thanks, your post was the push I needed, I did it again.

 No.1809

>>1808
The power of your futaposting appears to have killed it…



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 No.1168[Reply]

People would take open source software more seriously if Stallman took better care of himself. He looks like a stereotypical neckbeard, which doesn't help the image of free software.
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 No.1760

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>>1200
go back to 4chan, please

 No.1761

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I don't think Stallman is the issue of why free software isn't taken seriously.
I think that's more related to the fact that linux can be very cumbersome to those not accostumed to it (most of the population), so they tend to dismiss free software as something clunky that needs hours to do something propietary software would do in two clicks.
t. tried linux mint only to drop it due to no audio coming from the frontal ports

 No.1796

>>1168
That's like saying that the logo defines the success of a product, rather than advertising and merit…

 No.1799

>>1240
>>1241
There are some problems with FOSS software, usually minor but occasionally glaring and sometimes the result of some kind of malformed stubborn bullshit where the people with "creative direction" just never fucking hop on it. The big example is the fact that GIMP after all these goddamn years STILL doesn't have nondestructive photo editing, which is pretty much a prerequisite in actually doing any sort of semi-serious photo editing or even using it to draw.

Of course 99% of the population doesn't need these features, they only want to fix red-eye and add meme effects to Bogandoff, and hobbyists modelling weapons for their Skyrim mod don't need Maya, Blender has all the tools they'll ever need. But the fact that actual professional work really wants the tools that open source software actually does lack sometimes, or has but in degraded form, and the fact that contracts for open source software doesn't come with tech support, extreme priority security fixes, servers, and so on, means that it can't break into "real" work; and the fact that it's relegated almost entirely to the hobby and incidental use means that when people go looking for what software to use, they usually go looking for "the best" - and by most standards, professional closed source software, written by professionals and used by professionals to make all your favorite games and music and art, a class professionals that you, a serious user, wants to join - well then clearly there is only one superior option, even if GIMP does 99% of what photoshop does and arguably has a less memetastic UI.

>>1796
You would be astounded at how much money companies put into logo design and how it is shown to affect product performance.

 No.1807

>>1761
I'm still using it, but the mic has been broken on my system for a whole year due to an update of pulseaudio. they fixed it and it worked fine for half a year, but now they broke something with my mic again…

My self maintained custom Pkgfile for OSSv4 was more stable and less hassle than pulseaudio…



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 No.1759[Reply]

Protect with Tor, privacy and freedom of expression
Download Tor Browser in your language https://www.torproject.org/download/languages/

Welcome to the Wiki of those who defend the freedom
The Hidden Wiki
http://zqktlwiuavvvqqt4ybvgvi7tyo4hjl5xgfuvpdf6otjiycgwqbym2qad.onion/
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 No.1783

>>1782
some minor stuff that is exaggerated mostly, like with most security obsessed internet folk

 No.1784

Privacy is when you buy drugs and watch CP with your CIA browser.

 No.1785

isn't tor was made by the U.S goverment or collaborate with them?

 No.1786

>>1785
The protocol was originally developed by the US government. When they realized a private network has to have non-secret information on it to actually be private, they released it to the public. It is maintained by The Tor Project now which does receive research funding from the US government (or at least it did in 2012.)

 No.1803

Everyone's only buying drugs on tor
/t



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 No.545[Reply]

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 No.1725

>>559
>I'm an awkward cunt
Honestly these days normal people, in large part due to social media, are genuinely socially inept as well as unpleasant/domineering/narcissistic as a baseline. They've forgotten how to socialise properly and replaced it with the poison of those who are the most vocal/followed online.

 No.1726

>>548
I think it's the most accurate genre of speculative fiction by far

 No.1727

>>1582
I wrote this on march, and now I have to take it back, it's a soykafhole.
But there is no point in talking about that.

I'm nostalgic about the /cyb/ aesthetic. Makes me want to get back into low-level programming, and to learn russian to hang with the doomer boys on the internet. But it's all vanity, and I ultimately have no use, no time, and no real interest in it. I just end up with a truncated inspiration.

 No.1728

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>>1727
wtf are you me? For the past few months I've dreamed of becoming a grey-hat security researcher, an sushi rollymous hacking guru who knows how to construct exploits, who routinely scans websites for vulns, who knows how to decipher a stack-trace in gdb. It took a couple of months and some vain attempts to realise, like you have, that actually "hacking" is not my passion, but rather an idealised, renegade aesthetic that I want to inhabit without putting in the years of effort which it requires.

 No.1771

>>545
We need Systemspace back.



 No.1290[Reply]

Planned obsolescence – devices intentionally designed to break over time – has been getting really bad in recent years. Everything is disposable. Even when hardware works, you no longer get software updates, which can make a device useless because it'll no longer get security fixes or support for modern apps.

And haven't you noticed how, when a tech company comes out with a new product, they shit all over their old ones? Like "our new device is so awesome and fast, and our old one was so clunky and shitty by comparison!" But then a year later, they do the same process over again. And you're thinking… you bought it because people said it was good. But then the company that made it said it sucks. They do it to get you to buy the same thing over and over again.

When will this stop? Do you think everything will be disposable forever, or will there be enough backlash to planned obsolescence that will reverse this trend so that electronics in the future are made to last longer? People talk about "the invisible hand" of "the free market" but maybe government regulation is required to stop it.

An example of this is how my friend's phone battery wouldn't last very long, so he bought an entirely new phone, even though I told him I could replace the battery if he bought one on Amazon (and they were really cheap).
21 posts and 5 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1410

I think this is somewhat related to planned obsolescence, but it feels rare that a software "becomes lighter" or somehow uses less ram and cpu after an update. It feels like software producers assume you're updating your computer with every update and don't they spbt code like someone with a 2 year old computer could use it.

 No.1797

>>1304
Companies DO need to make money, and obsolescence IS a consequence of that fact. That said however, technology is inherently short lived. Build your ideal gayming pc and in 5 years your eyes will start to wander to newer and better things. This is why buying mortgages ("financing") your smartphone is a terrible idea. Even if it's built to last, it's not going to last very long. Furthermore, Wirth's Law indicates that the reason software updates get bigger and slow down your system are not because manufacturers are trying to make their code even less maintainable than it already is, but simply as the nature of (bad) software engineering the codebase grows larger and its performance grow's slower - an effect that only becomes apparent on hardware that does not itself have more memory and become faster (older devices).

The no-repair policy is inherently anti-consumer and needs to be opposed in legislation though. In an ideal world computational devices would be built to last longer (like IOT devices, RasPI's, etc) and be open-documentation-open-source to enable those who can to repair their devices when needed. As it stands, its simply not economical to go down that better route, and it's simply too easy to exploit the tech-illiterate unquestioning masses.

>>1305
Absolutely. Because no laws exist against it companies realize that its easier and more profitable to implement proprietary software-dependent systems running on cheap hardware than high-priced long-lived devices.

C'est La Vie.

 No.1798

>>1380
This post is uncomfy. Please return to your uncomfy board and be uncomfy there. Thank you~~

 No.1800

>>1410
>>1797
There's a marked difference between technical software and "mass" software in that respect. Most technical software is tightly coded, not necessarily without spaghetti code but generally lightweight for what it is, and they tend to have very high backwards compatibility. If they don't have backward compatibility then either it's a totally new sort of software for a totally new sort of data or it's a piece of shit 'ware.

Hell you can kind of even see it for Windows, the most "mass" software there is, because Windows has a sizeable technical userbase that needs it to keep supporting a piece of software written in the 80s by a company that's gone bankrupt in the 90s for hardware that hasn't even shown up in landfills since 2000, that's why you still can't name a file PRN, because writing a string in command line to the PRN file is a fucking ancient way to get a printer to print something that no printer has actually used for decades but somewhere there is a research team whose analysis software needs the ability to print something by writing to the PRN file and Microsoft knows that.

Mac, on the other hand, has basically a nonexistent technical userbase (and I mean like actually technical, not idiot art/music majors who think they're the next Chopin or Picasso) so they get away with dropping backwards compatibility for something only a few years old every update.

 No.1801

>>1290
>"our new device is so awesome and fast, and our old one was so clunky and shitty by comparison!

I sometimes think about that too, wouldn't it be funny if they used the Iphone 14's adverts to sell the Iphone 13?
"The new Iphone 13, a whole 50% slower than the Iphone 14!".

>but maybe government regulation is required to stop it.


This never works, it just create an extra level of bureaucracy and useless rules to follow. Just look at the repairability score France just implemented. It's just another fine print that no consumer care about.

This is not the duty of the state, it's the duty of consumers to stop falling for the shiny new toy every year. I think most people are completely fine with planned obsolescence, maybe even unconsciously hoping for it so that they can justify a new purchase.



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 No.1770[Reply]

These are our newest images from the surface of another world. It's really, genuinely beautiful.
2 posts omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1774

>>1773
I think it depends on your definition of 'colony'. I feel pretty strongly we'll see some kind of settlement on the moon, though.

 No.1776

It truly is beautiful. We, mankind that is, have a manifest destiny among the stars. We will get there someday. I believe that if not my children then my grandchildren will live to see the beginning of our species as multiplanitary.

The other thing I find so interesting is that if you cropped the rover out of that and told me it was just some dessert out west, I’d believe you. Just how small and how huge the universe is at the same time, it moves me man.

 No.1777

I always feel melancholic about achievements in space exploration.
If I had sucked up to my profs more, I might have been able to get into their research labs for space tech. That could have been fun

 No.1787

I love it like everyone else, but I need more people. We need to get out of LEO again.

>>1777
I know that feel. I work for NASA, but just having a bachelors (CS), I basically do industry, rather than research. Two sides of the same coin, I suppose. Grass is always greener as well.
Either way, follow your passion.

>>1773
Don't know how old you are but I can almost guarantee it will happen, but as >>1774 said, small settlements will come before self-sustaining economies.

 No.1795

Fake photos…



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 No.1762[Reply]

your comments fellow rolls?
3 posts omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1767

>>1766
What actual reason would they have to do that? Especially considering that Edge is Chromium-based in the first place.

 No.1768

>>1766
>>1767
Looked this up again. My first statement was mistaken. I was thinking of an article about Google making anti-competitive changes to YouTube etc to slow Edge users.

 No.1769

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>Microsoft Bingus

 No.1779

>>1762
Edge good Firefox Bad.

 No.1781

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>>1762
also searching for Firefox or Chrome in the windows start menu you'll also be marketed at



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 No.602[Reply]

Does anyone have any horror stories of what's happened to them personally while exploring the "Deep Web" or just any type of trouble they got themselves in?
11 posts omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1037

>>602
The deepweb is honestly underwhelming. Media and news really like to hype it up as something amazing, but in reality it's a bunch of marketplaces, blogs, and fake hitman services.
Probably worth checking out on your own, if only to sate your own thirst.

 No.1637

>>1037
I agree with this, but also a lot of dead and inactive links.

 No.1646

Not horror, more unnerving, but doxxing is a story I've seen play on the 'darkweb', more like drama sites and troll forums.

I've seen people post the reddit account of someone they found annoying then by going through their history they found accounts they cross linked to, small bits of data that build to a bigger picture, and tons of data that can be matched to IRL accounts. In >3 I've seen internet rando's connect a BDSM account to an actual IRL identity. Not even sushi rolls are safe because one imageboard 'doxxed' a user, they never wiped their cookies and their typing style/hill to die on matched another poster.

Of course it's unlikely to happen to anyone here, but it's unnerving to think all the dumb social media posts you made 5 years ago could be tracked to you IRL. Most people doing illegal stuff online are not caught through extreme hacking measures, they're caught because they made a slight slip up that links the tiniest part of their online profile to their IRL one.

 No.1780

>>602
Nothing Epic. Just browsing on a compromised protocol.

 No.1789

>>1646
What imageboard?



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