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 No.74[View All]

LINUX'!!'
>what is it?
An operating system that respects your freedom
>why would I use it?
If you are tired of having your OS use you and always wanted to use your computer instead
>What do you mean by freedom?
Write your own programs. use source code from the internet in seconds. update when you want to not when it tells you.
Want to run a website? cool! you can set one up in minutes.
Want to adjust your hardware to your liking? Awesome!
Want to stop or make a new feature to a program you use every day? Go for it!

Its your computer! use it how you want!
64 posts and 15 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.432

>>429
>Haven't run into this issue before and searching the help forums yields nothing unfortunately.
Ah yes. I remember those good old days long ago.
It is not all grim sushi, the future will be much better.

Pretty much it's like this.
You found some obscure problem that was perhaps found by others and not recorded on a forum or maybe you did something wrong. As I have found in Linux it is almost always something you did wrong.
You will (hopefully) tinker around with the system for hours/days/weeks untill you find out that one little thing that is so simple you cannot believe you missed it. The best part comes next. After all that tinkering you will have learned so much other stuff about your computer that the next problem will either not happen or be easier to solve, and there will be a next problem.
This is the path of the true sage or Linux guru.







Ok so you still have a problem and want help, read below.
>I couldn't connect to the internet at all
>The network connection itself was ok (could access anything on the local network fine)
A contradiction. That is how you are looking at it and is why you cannot solve it.

>couldn't connect to any websites, but I could get onto my NAS

A browser issue perhaps?

Try some tests on a terminal.
ifconfig <-network device might be called eth0 and should say "UP", there might be other usefull info in there and you can read the manual with "man ifconfig"
ping sushigirl.us
curl ifconfig.io
Install some other web based program "apt-get install internet-browser-deluxe" and test websites.
Run some other live Linux distro and see if things work on it.
Check your router settings.
Do more web searching for related issues or your issue reworded.

That likely didn't solve your problem but should help you get an idea for the direction to go in.

 No.433

>>429
ping 8.8.8.8 or some other ip address you know well.
If that works, then you just have a problem with the DNS, in most home networks the DNS server adress is the same as that of the router (192.168.1.254 in my LAN).
See http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man5/hosts.5.html to learn how to set up your DNS settings.
Sorry that I can't give you specific information, I don't know how network autoconfiguration is handled by systemd.

On the other hand, if you can't get past your router, then the link between your router an the remote service provider is broken. Check your cables and contact your ISP.

 No.465

File: 1489127186672.jpg (222.83 KB, 1200x1200, 1489110383871.jpg)

>>74 >>78 >>79 >>80 >>81 >>93 >>99 >>100 >>106 >>233 >>295 >>404 >>406 >>407 >>409 >>415 >>424 >>425 >>431 >>432

I'd just like to interject for a moment. What you're referring to as Linux, is in fact, GNU/Linux, or as I've recently taken to calling it, GNU plus Linux. Linux is not an operating system unto itself, but rather another free component of a fully functioning GNU system made useful by the GNU corelibs, shell utilities and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX.

Many computer users run a modified version of the GNU system every day, without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of GNU which is widely used today is often called "Linux", and many of its users are not aware that it is basically the GNU system, developed by the GNU Project.

There really is a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is just a part of the system they use. Linux is the kernel: the program in the system that allocates the machine's resources to the other programs that you run. The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless by itself; it can only function in the context of a complete operating system. Linux is normally used in combination with the GNU operating system: the whole system is basically GNU with Linux added, or GNU/Linux. All the so-called "Linux" distributions are really distributions of GNU/Linux.

 No.513

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>>465
It's actually just GNU. The kernel isn't the first thing that runs, it doesn't provide the bare minimum for the system to be usable, and building it isn't possible without GNU development tools.

When Linux includes the bootloader, provides the C standard library, and has a compiler, then maybe calling GNU systems GNU/Linux systems would make sense. Until then, Linux is just another replaceable component of a GNU system.

 No.514

How is one package manager "better" than another? (Like why does apt "suck?")

 No.515

>>513
>It's actually just GNU
A new level a memery has been achieved

 No.516

>>514
In the case of GNU/Linux distributions, it's probably just about how it handles dependencies.
However, in the case of Debian, packages are from the mainframe era (eg Emacs 25 is out, but you still get 23 (which is several years old) when you install with apt-get), which is not an inherent problem of apt but it's Debian's neglect for package updates or something.
In the case of Arch, you get only the bleeding edge, which sometimes causes conflicts because some packages don't yet use the library versions that came out next week.
In the case of Gentoo, you don't get binaries, so you have to compile everything. X took about 6 hours on a -j2. Luckily, they do provide a firefox binary, else your grandchildren would have grandchildren before it finishes compiling.

I particularly like the BSDs because you get both binaries, but also the port system which allows you to compile (while still mantaining dependencies in check). Compiling is often a good thing because you can choose, if you so want, to compile wihtout support for some libraries that you might not need. For example, Emacs25 has support for libwebkitgtk which is horrendous, and if your package manager decides you want webkit in your emacs, then you'd have to compile by hand which would leave the package manager oblivious of your Emacs, which in any clean or update may break things for you.

 No.517

>>516
I mean if you want Emacs25 without webkit (and let's face it, who wants webkit in his computer?)

 No.518

>>517
you can just compile it yourself. just set the $PREFIX to /home/sushi roll that won't interfere with the system's package. Usually installing extra things to straight to /usr/bin/ is something you don't do because that's the package managers job (unless you want to make a rpm or deb yourself, which you probably don't)

 No.577

How long should it take to install mint from a livedisk? It was going for ~50 minutes before I gave up on it. At first it threw up something about the hard drive, but I can repartition/format it fine through windows. Maybe my ISO burn is dodgy.

 No.578

>>577
I installed Mint yesterday from a USB, only took about 10 minutes. The ISO should be fine if you got it from their site, but you might want to check out another writing tool. I actually used Fedora's media writer.

 No.581

>>578
I used the default iso burner from the windows explorer. I read somewhere that writing at 16x speed can sometimes result in a badly burnt disk. It seems unlikely but I guess I'll give it another shot.

 No.583

>>581
I've used rufus and found it really good, made bootable usb of win7, linux mint, nas4free, arch and ubuntu from it no worries.

https : //rufus.akeo.ie/

 No.589

>>583
Don't know what the hell was going wrong. I tried again yesterday and it went no problems. Can't connect to the internet through network manager or the command line though. Baby steps I guess.

 No.590

>>589
>Can't connect to the internet through network manager or the command line though.

That's odd. I know with certain distros, you can't use non-free wifi firmware out of the box(Debian and Trisquel come to mind), but Mint should work out of the box with anything. If it's ethernet, that's an even stranger case.

 No.761

Today something happened and though I'm not exactly sure what it was exactly… I think systemd bricked my thinkpad.
That's right. I installed a systemd distro for the first time on it (after using decent stuff for years) and after two weeks it started halting the processor randomly. I hadn't changed the system yet because I was thinking of what to install next but I didn't get to, now my computer doesn't boot *at all*. The most likely culprit is, indeed, systemd. The last dmesg log I saw was a kernel message saying "systemd blocked for more than 120 seconds" or something like that. And now it don't boot.

I am kinda mad, but in a way, I was already annoyed with the whole panorama of computing. I detest GNU with a passion, and lately I couldn't stop thinking of how harmful GNU has come to be, and to an extent, linux itself. And perhaps even Unix to boost.
I would start a campaign against systemd and GNU out of spite, but it would accomplish nothing. I would rather let it all burn while I move on to more worthwhile subjects like math.
Have fun with your trainwreck of an OS guys :^)

 No.762

>>761
I've been seeing reports recently of a certain distro bricking certain machines recently. I think it had to do with an Intel driver.

I have no idea how something like that could even happen. But this is something that should never have left the testing stage. If the software isn't used for flashing ROMs, there is no reason for any software to be able to brick any computer.

 No.770

>>122
press alt-f2 (essentially changing to a diffrent terminal, alt-f1 to go back, its sometimes alt-shift-f# or something else), if the font problem persists idk. If its normal in the new terminal, use a diffrent DE, I recommend gnome3 if your new to Arch.

 No.771

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>>761
Every more popular OS is fucked even worse, their hordes of engineers just keep the surface gui skin from springing too many holes that let the bullshit of whats actually going on leak out. GNU doesnt do that as well cause they dont have the same armies of chimps maintaining a ""UX"" illusion, as they're not looking for your normie families dependence and user data.
You've realized how completely, totally backwards and fucked up software is, congratulations. I urge you to contemplate the idea of this fuckedness as an extension of how backwards and fucked up modern societies entire philosophy around the construction and use of tools is.

If you ever feel like using a computer again, try learning plan9.

 No.777

>>771
but they do, just look at how it's all GNOME and KDE and just about every major distro comes bloated to hell and back for a blanket.
>You've realized how completely, totally backwards and fucked up software is, congratulations
Yes I'm all about maths now don't show me any software ever again. Though honestly I advocate for going back to the days of assembler when things made sense.
> try learning plan9.
I wish I had hardware that can run plan9, sometime maybe

 No.778

>>777
>Yes I'm all about maths now don't show me any software ever again. Though honestly I advocate for going back to the days of assembler when things made sense.
I'd advocate going the functional programming route. It's like math too.
Only the software that legitimately can't be written otherwise should be written in ways that can't be proven to be correct.

Also yes, systemd does brick laptops by that r/w efivars mounting """"feature"""".

>>762
Is this related to Intel's fuckups with branch prediction leaks?
Why anyone trusts or ever trusted intel is completely beyond me. They're the absolute bottom of the processor industry, having assloads of money to throw at problems being their only reason for any viable product existing.

>>771
>try learning plan9
I just want a plan9-like system but built around lisp instead of C and C++. Imagine an acme where the commands and programs you run by clicks are actually lisp code.
I'm having far too much fun selectively compiling functions into a running program with SLIMV, I want a computing environment where this type of wizardry is the norm rather than something esoteric and unheard of.

 No.779

>>778
>They're the absolute bottom of the processor industry
yakuza stop this madness :^) btw znc is up again, sorry about the downtime

 No.780

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>>778
there isnt a line of c++ in plan9 because plan9 doesnt have a c++ compiler. the pain of working at google without a c++ compiler is why some of its devs abandoned it.
I personally prefer sam+rio etc etc anyways, though.
>>777
you ignored the most important part. come on, you're into math, you're halfway there.

 No.784

>>761
Systemd is not a GNU project. Also, a Thinkpad… tried reflashing its firmware? It's basically the only thing the OS/Kernel has the access rights needed to brick.

 No.786

>>779
T-that was not me argman.
Also sorry for not showing up lately, I'm a wagie now.
>>780
>you ignored the most important part
I've always liked math before I got into the horrid mess of software.
Lately Linear Algebra and Geometry are far more engaging to me than interfacing with .so files.

 No.787

File: 1517899489146.png (4.92 KB, 800x600, pretty.png)

Are there any good new wm or de that dont just copy windows or osx? (i know of tiled window managers like i3 and bspwm already)

 No.788

>>787
what does 'new' have to do with it?
cwm is the best window manager on unix btw.

 No.789

>>788
"new" meaning one thats trying something new, not necessarily in regards to time but uniqueness.

 No.796

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>>787
You might want to take a look at OpenBox. It's got a lot of the easy accessibility of DEs, but with a more minimal approach like WMs. It looks nothing like Windows or Mac.

 No.797

I used to have this one crappy notebook that couldn't even handle Windows XP properly. It was my mom's, but she got tired of it because it really sucked and it froze all the time. So I asked my now boyfriend, at that time acquaintance, who at the time was still living with his parents and was hilariously piss poor, about a linux distro that could help. He gave me Lubuntu. Holy shit, all of a sudden this thing could play videos and I could also run VNs in there (I actually played the first Higurashi on that computer), it was great. I had a really good experience.

I also like Mint. I used to always have a dualboot with both Windows and Mint with Mate.

 No.799

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I've used CRUX for about 10 years now. Got so tired of playing around with USE flags in Gentoo and binary packages in other distributions with broken dependencies or file collisions. Simple distributions like CRUX doesn't have a lot of packages, and doesn't always work flawlessly, but due to their simplicity, I find them so easy to fix, and I think I spend less time "working" on fixing things with CRUX than I do with other more complicated distributions. The simplicity makes it easy to make new packages quickly as well, and I don't need to know much more than how to compile the application to do it.

I currently only use it on my laptop and home server, but I want to install CRUX on my new desktop soon too. Decided I wanted to try out Fedora on my desktop when I got it, and that one's driving me crazy. There are lots of packages, but not for the software that I want, and systemd makes everything complicated and somewhat obfuscated. Doesn't feel as nice as editing simple rc files. Wanted to try Lunar and Source Mage before I moved to CRUX ages ago, so I think I might give those a go too, but I'll probably keep those in virtual machines.

Systemd is really annoying, and many other things like GRUB2 and pulseaudio is annoying to deal with as well. I might just be a luddite, but I mostly think simple and old software is any fun. New software got too damn complicated.

 No.801

>>74
>>295
I highly recommend slackware. Stable as hell.

 No.803

how did you guys learned the terminal? should i study bash or something?

 No.804

>>803
Nothing better than man pages in my opinion. In case you don't know what those are, you can type 'man [program]', e.g. 'man rm', and it will tell you all about how to use said program.

With that in mind, all the core utilities are usually stored in /bin. So, if you have a free afternoon, do:
ls /bin
and then man all the program names which come up.

Maybe you're already past the basics, though. In that case, yeah, learning bash scripting would be good. I can't help you much there, though.

 No.807

>>803
I read a book about GNU/Linux and UNIX a long time ago, and that introduced me to basic stuff like ls and cd. Since I was already used to command and the old MSDOS utilities, getting used to basic usage was simply remembering to use ls instead of dir. The book also mentioned basic stuff like aliases and libraries. Other than that I simply toyed around editing files in /etc and doing as >>804 said, you can learn a lot from reading man pages. In addition to man pages, you can also get basic information about a program and available flags by appending -h or –help to the command.

These days, there should be loads of good articles on basic shell usage. I thought the articles on funtoo.org are fairly decent. I don't think it explains the basic commands for navigating around the filesystem, but it talks about variables and such.

https://www.funtoo.org/Bash_by_Example,_Part_1

 No.808

>>807
There is also this article about the fundamentals.

https://www.funtoo.org/Linux_Fundamentals,_Part_1

Not sure how proficient you are, but you can get far with just the basics. Knowing scripting is useful, but I don't think it is required for most users. There are some neat tricks one can learn through scripting tho. Like when you want to make a backup of a config file before you start editing it.

cp /etc/fstab{,.bak} instead of cp /etc/fstab /etc/fstab.bak.

 No.813

>>804
>>807
>>808
Thanks, guys, i'm gonna check these out. Btw, i'm at the basics level, using ubuntu on my second notebook.

 No.815

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>>803
Mastering the terminal is achieved through trial, error, and persistence. Read as much as you can about every new word or acronym you come across. Don't be afraid to break things, either. Just keep on truckin'.

 No.950

>>200
You can set it as your login shell, but keep /bin/sh as bash or dash. The `chsh' command is what you want to use, but in my experience editing /etc/passwd manually is more reliable. GUI terminal emulators may require additional configuration.
>>309
Just check a list of all your installed packages, and delete the ones you don't want. If you use gentoo you can edit your /var/lib/portage/world to remove old crap you don't need, and then run emerge –depclean.
>>799
Alpine has a similar simplicity to it. I've just switched to it from Gentoo, because I was a retard and I deleted some important libraries. I was unable to fix the problem manually within a reasonable timeframe and I didn't feel like compiling everything from scratch, so I backed up /home and switched to Alpine.

 No.951

File: 1526229147844.png (145.54 KB, 1366x768, bluh.png)

So I'm using Linux Mint Cinnamon, is there a way to show thumbnails in the filepicker? If not, what distribution should I use that does? My PC is very old, like, it is an HP pavilion g6. With about 4 gigs of RAM.

 No.952

>>951
Thumbnails like that is something people have been asking about for a long time now. There are patches floating around I think, but nobody with power within the GTK project seems too interested in adding such a feature themselves. I get around that issue by using my regular file manager and drag the file I want over to the application I want it open in (that's also something that can be inconsistent, not everything supports drag and drop).

QT applications (that would be anything KDE and related applications) has a file picker that supports thumbnails. So it might be worth trying QT and KDE alternatives to the applications you use. Kubuntu comes bundled with KDE, and I'm sure you can use KDE with Mint as well.

I want to enjoy free software on my desktop systems, but I think these kinds of things makes free software a little annoying outside of CLI tools. I wish desktop environments were a lot more consistent and supported these kinds of features.

 No.1104

bump

 No.1105

File: 1536053214351.gif (578 B, 192x80, dwm_official_logo.gif)

as far as the desktop is concerned I can't imagine using anything other than dwm on Linux or *BSD. a really great piece of software.

running Crux on a spare T60 that I toy around with, I like how hands off it is, and I got tired of dealing with portage when it was running Gentoo.

Arch on my desktop.

I've had Openbsd running on those machines and more at various times but the lack of (or pains with) various software made me switch back to Linux land.

 No.1524

Linux is a kernel, not an operating system

 No.1527

>>1524
most people already know that dumbass, but it's easier to refer to various Linux-based operating systems as just "Linux", you think I'm gonna say "Linux based Operating system Ubuntu" every time in casual conversation

 No.1528

File: 1580109686980.png (393.6 KB, 1568x1045, 41add5aecc4ab12f.png)

>>1527
You should say GNU/Linux. It shows that you care about software freedom.

 No.1529

File: 1580126428421.jpg (32.69 KB, 580x450, 1570981961907.jpg)

>>1524
>Linux is a kernel, not an operating system

I'd just like to interject for a moment. What you're referring to as Linux, is in fact, GNU/Linux, or as I've recently taken to calling it, GNU plus Linux.
Linux is not an operating system unto itself, but rather another free component
of a fully functioning GNU system made useful by the GNU corelibs, shell
utilities and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX.

Many computer users run a modified version of the GNU system every day,
without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of GNU
which is widely used today is often called "Linux", and many of its users are
not aware that it is basically the GNU system, developed by the GNU Project.

There really is a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is just a
part of the system they use. Linux is the kernel: the program in the system
that allocates the machine's resources to the other programs that you run.
The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless by itself;
it can only function in the context of a complete operating system. Linux is
normally used in combination with the GNU operating system: the whole system
is basically GNU with Linux added, or GNU/Linux. All the so-called "Linux"
distributions are really distributions of GNU/Linux.

 No.1530

File: 1580206183177.jpg (141.61 KB, 1024x976, poettering.jpg)

>>1529
I'd just like to interject for a moment. What you're referring to as Linux, is in fact, Systemd/Linux, or as I've recently taken to calling it, Systemd plus Linux.Linux is not an operating system unto itself, but rather another free component
of a fully functioning Systemd system made useful by the Systemd corelibs, shell
utilities and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX.

Many computer users run a modified version of the Systemd system every day,
without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of Systemd
which is widely used today is often called "Linux", and many of its users are
not aware that it is basically the Systemd system, developed by the Systemd Project.

There really is a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is just a
part of the system they use. Linux is the kernel: the program in the system
that allocates the machine's resources to the other programs that you run.
The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless by itself;
it can only function in the context of a complete operating system. Linux is
normally used in combination with the Systemd operating system: the whole system
is basically Systemd with Linux added, or Systemd/Linux. All the so-called "Linux"
distributions are really distributions of Systemd/Linux.

 No.1531

>sed -i "s/GNU/Systemd/g"
>still works as a shitpost

 No.1534

File: 1580464626778.webm (642.44 KB, 1024x576, 1579277692858.webm)

>>1530
I'd just like to interject for a moment.

What you're referring to as Sushichan, is in fact, vichan/Sushichan, or as I've recently taken to calling it, vichan plus Sushichan.
Sushichan is not an operating system unto itself, but rather another free component
of a fully functioning vichan system made useful by the vichan corelibs, shell
utilities and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX.

Many computer users run a modified version of the vichan system every day,
without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of vichan
which is widely used today is often called "Sushichan", and many of its users are
not aware that it is basically the vichan system, developed by the vichan Project.

There really is a Sushichan, and these people are using it, but it is just a
part of the system they use. Sushichan is the kernel: the program in the system
that allocates the machine's resources to the other programs that you run.
The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless by itself;
it can only function in the context of a complete operating system. Sushichan is
normally used in combination with the vichan operating system: the whole system
is basically vichan with Sushichan added, or vichan/Sushichan. All the so-called "Sushichan"
distributions are really distributions of vichan/Sushichan.



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