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File: 1553430660026.jpg (1.2 MB, 2268x1158, 1552968687904.jpg)

 No.1317[Reply]

I'm currently in the process of trying to merge my active directories into my backup folders, but it's not going that well. Active folders have grown differently than the backup tree, without neither being more "correct".
E.g. sorting images based on why they were saved (aesthetically pleasing, lewd, funny, etc) or the contents.

How do you manage your folders of saved things? Any tips?
How do you deal with things that could belong in multiple places at once and no particular one is more correct?
12 posts and 5 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1382

Write a program that extracts features from files, classifies them, and prompts for your approval to perform an action. It can start simple, but it allows for more complexity later. In a sense, this type of system allows files to "describe themselves."

 No.1383

>>1317
I just ordered a 8TB ext-HDD, so I'm preparing myself to start doing the same in order to back everything up.

>>1318
This seems like some solid advice. I need to start doing this as well.

 No.1385

Once in a year I delete everything i have and start over
People don't need to hoard so many things

 No.1386

>>1385
I have a serious hoarding problem myself personally. Any advice on how to let things go?

 No.1396

File: 1567694244165-0.jpg (127.5 KB, 1280x720, Does it spark joy.jpg)

File: 1567694244165-1.png (167.53 KB, 600x322, whiz tree.png)

>>1386
Oddly enough Mari Kondo. Her "does it spark joy" thing helped me out. Wiztree is also good because it helps you visualize all your files. Instead of seeing a thousand of 50 mb folders you see 1 giant 50gb file. What do you horde exactly?



File: 1564955367891.png (2.21 MB, 1684x1191, いちご.png)

 No.1378[Reply]

One interesting thing about open source software is that you can fully replicate an existing solution, modify it, and use it almost immediately to solve your problem.

When we look at open source hardware, we see that, yes, the same principle appears to apply, but it is missing the manufacturing component. Whereas a shell script in the software world might produce a binary that you can use, the hardware world doesn't have the same type of tool.

>From where should I source the parts to build the product?

>How do I assemble the parts once I get my hands on them?

By answering these questions, we provide the _full_ open source hardware solution that many of these open source hardware projects seem to fail to specify.

However, once we specify this information, we enter the real world where political forces exist, and simple sourcing information can immediately disrupt a supply-demand equilibrium. A solution that was previously economically viable through specified channels immediately becomes nonviable, something with which the open source software world doesn't have to deal.

My question is

_What will have to occur to bring the flexibility of the open source software world to the open source hardware world?_

 No.1379

Until you can instantly duplicate and send parts for hardware over the internet, just as you do with software, it cannot be as flexible as software. All you can do is give the schematics freely and let people replicate it if they so choose.



File: 1561216050647.jpg (1.07 MB, 1000x1444, 1ce0d716fd3221378bb721e73f….jpg)

 No.1362[Reply]

I would like to make an imageboard but not sure where to begin. If I get a LAMP stack running, how can I effectively install vichan without bugs? I have tried several times without succeeding because either posts do not work or the domain does not readily map over a raw IP address.

 No.1363

>>1362
>the domain does not readily map over a raw IP address.
What exactly do you mean by this? I am not a vichan expert at all but that sounds like it's not a problem with the imageboard software.

If you have control of the domain, you should be able to point it to a single IP. If you are trying to run an imageboard on a computer at home, where your IP might change, then dynamic DNS is, as far as I know, what you should be looking at.

 No.1364

File: 1561473303172.jpg (45.93 KB, 526x526, 1460839721857.jpg)

I'll snuggle up in here as well as a thread freeloader if that's okay with you OP, better than having two just slightly different threads on kind of the same subject.
I wouldn't want to host a chan, but I've wanted to try out writing my own board software for a while for fun and to explore concepts and stuff. I've yet to touch on web dev though, just learning some general programming. How far into webdev would one have to pry to realistically be able to squeeze out a board? What stuff would one have to learn?

Also anybody have any chan features they've thought would be cool to have?

 No.1365

File: 1561480902675.png (24.34 KB, 475x389, cdraw.png)

If you're vaguely familiar with how PHP is executed and you know how to set up other hosted software, you will probably be able to understand how to set up your own board. You will probably have to follow these steps.

1. Point your domain to the server that your board is hosted on (i.e., create A and AAAA records with your DNS provider). For Google Domains, their documentation describes how to do this (https://support.google.com/a/answer/2579934?hl=en).
2. Set up the web server (e.g., nginx) to which you just pointed your domain to direct requests to your CGI or FCGI software (e.g., DokuWiki).
3. Perform initial set up as necessary (e.g., adding SQL connections strings or creating an initial administrator user).

 No.1368

>>1362
Are you using an actual internet-facing server or just trying to self-host on your home network? If it's the later then you're probably dealing with some NAT issues. Self-hosting generally isn't a good idea anyway.



 No.1161[Reply]

Any wiki needs out there? I just set up a MediaWiki instance and I’m having a lot of fun. I will post a link if anyone is interested in sand boxing around.
2 posts and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1333

>>1332
That's an intriguing idea. What kind of articles would we have? I know there would be a bit of sushichan history, but anything apart from that?

 No.1334

>>1333
>What kind of articles would we have
Not sure, we could have a history section, as you said, but we could also have sections specific to each board, and maybe sushi style ricing/config guides?

 No.1335

I setup pmwiki two weeks ago nice using it so far

 No.1336

i remember this thing called tiddlywiki that was very simple to use

link: https://tiddlywiki.com/

 No.1342

Mediawiki is a great piece of software. It introduced me to server hosting.



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File: 1546418918469-1.jpg (120.52 KB, 426x356, cables-bad.jpg)

 No.1301[Reply]

the virgin cable management vs. the chad spaghetti

 No.1303

There are these little twist tie things I found at the hardware store for pretty cheap. They’ve got a wire inside them which holds its shape when bent and a rubbery outer coating. They’re pretty great. I use them to keep my wires in my backpack organized.



File: 1502316332330.png (75.5 KB, 800x800, __chen_touhou_drawn_by_tor….png)

 No.631[Reply]

Hello guys i need help im trying to make my own imageboard. but i am very new to this. i once installed vichan through gui years back but i get this issue when i try to install the program through putty.
[code]:~/vichan# php install.php
The program 'php' can be found in the following packages:
* php7.0-cli
* hhvm
Try: apt install <selected package>
[/code]
7 posts omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1227

>>1222
>Node is not like PHP where stuff turn into shit because of a bad foundation.
but Node is like that.

 No.1228

>>1226
But you are not forced to use npm, you can use yarn or just copy libraries wherever you want. And you can always check the whole dependency tree, not to mention that is not hard to go by without pulling a million dependencies. What you are confusing here is a community issue with a technology issue. The technology is fine, the community is just bad. Which is not at all surprising, ANY popular technology manages to turn like that. Java and PHP are two other examples that no matter what the technology would offer, you would still have masses of inept developers using it.

 No.1229

>>1228
I'm not confusing it at all. They're both related. As a user, I don't want to use good technology that end up ruined by the community. Another package manager isn't going to fix the lameness of language specific package managers. If they do use a package manager, it should not ever install to /usr or /usr/local (the former belongs to the package manager, the latter belongs the the make install guy). a subdirectory under /opt is fine. I would prefer if they made it very clear to never run their package managers as root as well.

I think it is overall much easier to deal with software in perl than most of these newer languages, mostly due to the culture around them. perl software is rarely an issue to deal with. Clearly defined dependencies, easy to work with without their specified package manager. Many other languages like python, ruby, node end up very annoying to deal with in my opinion. They might be fine languages, but software by other people is a chore to deal with.

 No.1230

If you're a beginner, use Vichan. Lynxchan has some nice features and it's fast and it's still actively developed, but you have to be an expert to install and use it. I tried experimenting with it a while back and it was pretty awful to get working and to modify, though I cobbled it together eventually. You also probably aren't going to be able to run it without shell access to your server, which means you need a VPS instead of a shared host, and you have to be good at using Linux on top of knowing node.js. Beginners should stay away from Lynxchan. It will be an incredibly frustrating experience.

 No.1250




File: 1466474235065.png (350.6 KB, 814x822, pyra trash mockup.png)

 No.26[Reply]

Has anyone seen/used the Pyra yet?

It looks comfy but it is pricy.
5 posts omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.38

>>37
I was thinking of trying to make one of these super portable and cheap from-scratch handhelds at some point.

http://n-o-d-e.net/post/141489192021/how-to-create-a-handheld-linux-terminal-v2

 No.68

That is certainly interesting, although I think I need to get a real laptop from this decade before I go about getting something like this.

 No.70

>>26
Looks awesome but the price point isn't the greatest and realistically I know I wouldn't use it enough to justify buying it. Still interested to see how it is when it actually comes out though, the pandora was pretty good.
>>38
That would make a pretty fun project.

 No.101

Why not hack together your own for much much less?

 No.1248

>>27
Pocket chip died :(
You can't officially buy it anymore



File: 1465176497320.gif (473.46 KB, 500x355, 1445041507227.gif)

 No.1[Reply]

Welp, everybody's claiming First in all the other boards and I don't want to be left behind. Thankfully the nerd board is still avaiblable.
What are you girls working on?
Me: chip-8 VM in ruby
28 posts and 8 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1189

>>1188
This sushi roll is correct. With a help desk job you still have to deal with people but it's nowhere near the same level as a call centre job, especially if you work for a small company.

 No.1191

>>1188
Ok, I was confused. In my language, the English term "help desk" is also used for call center tech support.

University help desks can be pretty comfy.

 No.1242

i'm making a game in bash

 No.1246

>>1242
Please, share

 No.1247

>>1246
i will when it's finished.



File: 1538098743801.jpg (47.11 KB, 220x330, stallman.jpg)

 No.1168[Reply]

People would take open source software more seriously if Stallman took better care of himself. He looks like a stereotypical neckbeard, which doesn't help the image of free software.
33 posts and 17 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.1236

>>1225
I used to use a Linux distro as a daily driver OS, back when I was young and didn't use a computer for work or college. But now that I'm older, and do a lot more stuff on my computer, there is a massive gap in support for commercial software in Windows and macOS (similarly well-supported) and GNU/Linux (practically non-existent).

If your requirements are pretty basic, GNU/Linux seems fine for a desktop OS.

But you can't use a lot of industry-standard tools for it. The problem is that a lot of people who don't use these things think the FOSS equivalents are "good enough" even though that's not the case.

GIMP really isn't as good as Photoshop. LibreOffice is quirky sometimes, and that can be an issue when you work with people who all use Microsoft Office 365. Outlook is standard as an office email client, Thunderbird isn't that great.

IF all you do is web-based stuff, you won't notice a difference. But try using GNU/Linux for creative work, programming, or office job stuff, and you'll notice all the flaws. There are a lot of what I'd call "spinoff apps" in GNU/Linux desktop OS repos, and although they might look relatively decent, most really aren't.

People don't use an OS for the OS itself. They use an OS so they can run software in it. Nobody cares about bits and bytes and window managers. People care about getting a project done before a deadline, using tools that enhance their workflow, stability, actual customer support (forums and image boards don't count), etc. As Steve Ballmer once said, "developers developers developers developers developers developers developers developers." 3rd party development is what really makes or breaks an OS. The software ecosystem around an OS is really important.

Linux is continuing to prove itself useful for embedded and IoT scenarios, and will always be the best choice for servers, but GNU/Linux is less and less relevant for desktop stuff.

Post too long. Click here to view the full text.

 No.1237

>>1236
>The problem is that a lot of people who don't use these things think the FOSS equivalents are "good enough" even though that's not the case.

I can kinda relate to this, I remember a discussion where I was told that I should use emulators for gaming on Linux or "get a console" when I pointed out how poor PC gaming is on Linux. So, actually, I completely understand what you mean even though I don't use any sort of industry standard software.

And, actually, it's kinda silly, but I use Windows as well not just for gaming but sometimes I find the tools for creating Linux bootable drives way better. Again, even though I'd love to see more people with basic needs use Linux on their laptops and desktops, even I use different OSes for different tasks.

I guess the only other issue with FOSS is the immature "Wangblows" and "Botnet 10" buzzwording. I don't know how to talk with people like that since the debate never goes anywhere.

 No.1238

File: 1540574781193.png (728.88 KB, 1924x1231, Screenshot at 2018-10-26 1….png)

>>1236
>Outlook is standard as an office email client, Thunderbird isn't that great.
On the free software side, I've settled on Evolution. I could never enjoy thunderbird or claws/sylpheed, and I don't know if it can replace Outlook for businesses, but I think it is a decent alternative for someone like me that was perfectly happy with Apple's Mail.app.

But as you say, my requirements are basic (outside of virtual machines).

>>1237
But all you need is Quake :3

 No.1240

File: 1540667214074.png (279.66 KB, 473x1061, 1517481457295.png)

>>1236
> But try using GNU/Linux for creative work
This is merely a personal thing, but the times when I used open source stuff for creative work, I had no problem working with it. Krita is already well known and loved, but personally I largely stuck with doing stuff in MyPaint and Inkscape after I decided to stop pirating Adobe stuff. GIMP is pretty clunky, and Inkscape posed some issue initially too, but I could still work well with the tools I had.

It's likely I'm not quite advanced enough to need the Adobe tools. On the other hand, David Revoy exists.

 No.1241

>>1240
Yeah, I have to agree. I don't really find there is much difference at the low level between modern popular open source software, and closed source enterprise software. Ten years ago there were pretty big differences, but today the only real differences I notice tend to be in the UI department, and in how the software corporations get to dictate how people relate to software in general. Like people say how clunky open source is, but I think that's mainly because their baseline has been set based on whatever software they use at work. As someone who hasn't really used commercial software outside of when it's absolutely necessary (for work comparability and stuff), I find that often times the commercial stuff is just as clunky and poorly designed, but people just take that for granted. It being "intuitive" or better is just a function of being more exposed to it.

I mean, of course it is true that companies like adobe cater to industries creating tools and tweeks for specific clients and such, that isn't really gonna happen in an open source community driven product, but I don't think those are nearly as useful to users as they are to firms with specific market goals. I've always got the feeling that when most people say "open source software is inadequate" they really mean "I do not want to learn a whole new system when I already know this one inside and out". It's fine to prefer a polished commercial system that you know, but I don't think it's fair that FOSS gets a bad rap because of that.



File: 1540525031494.jpg (81.98 KB, 618x332, tech.jpg)

 No.1232[Reply]

Whenever I try to teach my dad about new tech, he will try to make some convoluted analogy comparing it to other things he is familiar with. I say no, it's not like that at all, don't make these inaccurate and confusing comparisons.

But maybe it's hard for old people to learn new things, especially new tech, because they have so many memories, and their brains have made certain neural pathways and have decreased neuroplasticity, so it's hard for them to just think of new things on their own and not comparing them to lots of other things they are already familiar with.

Sometimes I make this learning mistake, but sometimes it's easier just to learn something without trying to think of how it relates to other things. Whether it's a new programming paradigm, a new programming language, new app, new API, etc there isn't always a direct comparison to something else.

Thoughts? What have your experiences been like when you learn new tech?

 No.1233

Depends on the analogies. It seems fine to me that someone compare some new concept to something they already is familiar with. The most important thing is that they learn.

I myself like to simplify, like when people talk about cloud stuff like azure and their "apps", and all I see is a virtual machine running on hardware you don't own or manage yourself. I often get strong resistance from such people when I simplify like that. Usually I just see a new spin on old technology. The worst ones strongly disagree with what I said, then change a few words and repeat back to me what I just said. Maybe they think I'm dismissing their new stuff as unimportant, which isn't the case at all.

I often have a hard time learning from documentation and guides that just list out all the commands you need to run to get your desired result. I need to learn why you must run those commands, and I want the explanation in plain english. I think Gentoo and FreeBSD are good about such things, and is something I try hard to live up to when I have to teach something to some new user.

 No.1234

This is how everyone learns; the human brain is always trying to contextualise new knowledge in relation to old. We begin with fuzzy representaions that may be wrong in many areas, but provide enough information to engage with that object. The next crucial stage is coming to realise, through use, the ways in which computer is not actually like a car and needs a set of symbols of its own.

Don't be hard on your dad just because he didn't grow up with modern technology like you did. I have no doubt that there are concepts out there that you understand in terms of how they're simmilar to computers.

>>1233
It's the classic mistake of describing all the details of [i]what[/i] something is, when most of the time a user actually wants to know [i]how[/i] it should be used. The OpenBSD man pages are generally excellent at providing practical examples; I frequently check them, even when working on Gnu/Linux.

 No.1235

>>1233
Azure and AWS are more than just VMs. Containers and container orchestrators (and microservices architecture you can create with it) is very different from traditional hypervisors and VMs in the sense of scalability, and creating/destroying containers really quickly on an as-needed basis ("elasticity"). There's also caching, lots of APIs you won't get with a basic hypervisor, and the fact that many places are looking to hire people with these specific skills. And, of course, the issue of not having to build a data center to have at-scale resources.

A reductionist approach to it isn't going to make anyone think you're smart just because you're vaguely familiar with something you think is the same even when it's really not.

Documentation is important, but you're right, a lot of documentation is hard to follow. I think part of that is because experiential learning is best. It's hard to get an idea of how to use something based on a man page, but doing on online course, or an in-person workshop at a hackathon is wonderful for learning. These days, I actually prefer watching Youtube tutorials over reading documentation, with the one exception being the Oracle API documentation, which is really good, even if you're not a fan of Java.

But I also think a lot of boomers in tech take pride in the fact that there is a barrier to entry, and they kind of enjoy that some things are difficult to learn, even if it's only because documentation and community resources are poor. They want that elitist mentality instead of making things easier to use.

A program being hard to use is an example of bad UX, which is the fault of the developer. But a lot of "1337" people think something being hard to use makes it better. I do a lot of frontend development and if the user can't figure out how to use it, that's your problem, not theirs.

 No.1239

>>1235
>A reductionist approach to it isn't going to make anyone think you're smart just because you're vaguely familiar with something you think is the same even when it's really not.

Someone that sees the nuts and bolts aren't trying to sound smart. They just see the simple construct the bigger house is really made of. A lot of people see the big house and think they can't ever fix that on their own, others just see the broken bolt and replace that.

Yes there are APIs, and yes it is scalable, and reduces the need for a business to run their own data center, but it is still very much just a bunch of virtual machines. You're renting a machine preinstalled with MSSQL, or maybe another with some other service (or no services). A lot of cloud providers that just present their stuff as KVM-based virtual machines also have APIs for developers and admins.



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